Aims and objectives

Mission Statement
To promote the wider knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of the art of Thomas Gainsborough within the context of the eighteenth century and the inspiration of the Suffolk landscape and to preserve and enhance Gainsborough’s House and its collections for the benefit of present and future generations.

Vision Statement
Gainsborough’s House, the childhood home of Thomas Gainsborough is a national centre for the exploration of Gainsborough’s art, the development of the English landscape and the art of printmaking. With Thomas Gainsborough as its inspiration it seeks to bring to life the art and ideals of Thomas Gainsborough to inspire a new generation of visitors.

Public Benefit
Gainsborough’s House’s charitable objects, are to preserve the trust property, create an arts centre and museum, collect, curate and display works of art and further the development of the arts through education and events. It also achieves the public benefit requirement through offering many of its events, activities, courses and publications either free to users or at heavily subsidised rates, mainly thanks to grants generated from charitable trusts and foundations and donations from the public. These include: free admission on special days; entrance to exhibitions at no extra cost; events open to non-members; free or subsidised workshops for the old, vulnerable, disadvantaged, youth, schools, community groups and families.

The Society is aware that the public’s opportunity to benefit must not be limited by geographical or other restrictions. Although most of its activities take place in the South Suffolk and North Essex area, visitors come from all over the UK and abroad, and concessions on ticket prices are offered to children and students. The Friends, Patrons and Mulberry Patrons membership schemes are open to all.

As part of the development planning of the organisation, the Trustees will continue to ensure that its activities enhance the participation and enjoyment of as many sections of the public as possible. To this end, the Society is working on a database of its entire collection, which will be shared via the website free to users everywhere.